Warping it up!

Fini Alring's Glossy Tech Zine

The future of XML

Friday, February 8th, 2008

Elliotte Rusty Harold prognosticates what he thinks is in store for XML.
The wheels of progress turn slowly, but turn they do. The crystal ball might be a little hazy, but the outline of XML’s future is becoming clear. The exact time line is a tad uncertain, but where XML is going isn’t. XML’s future lies with the Web, and more specifically with Web publishing.

It seems a little funny to have to say that. After all, isn’t publishing what the Web is about? The Web was designed first and foremost as a mechanism to publish information. What else can it do? Quite a lot. The last three years have seen an explosion of interest in Web applications that go far beyond traditional Web sites. Word processors, spreadsheets, games, diagramming tools, and more are all migrating into the browser. This trend will only accelerate in the coming year as local storage in Web browsers makes it increasingly possible to work offline. But XML is still firmly grounded in Web 1.0 publishing, and that’s still very important.

Read the full article:

No LEGO NXT Dev for me!!

Monday, February 27th, 2006

I can’t even begin to describe how sad and disappointed I am… I think I will make this post shorter so I can cry even more…

I did however recieve a Pre-Order link, so perhaps it will arrive before the summer is over…

Dear LEGO fan,

Thank you very much for your interest in participating in the LEGO® MINDSTORMS™ Developer Program. We are very sorry but unfortunately you have not been selected to take part in the Program. Over 9000 fans sent in their applications and it was extremely difficult selecting 100 people only.

Release: NetBeans 5.0

Thursday, February 2nd, 2006

NetBeans — My favorite Java / J2EE development environment, har just been released in version 5.0, much have changed since the 3.x, 4.x versions and I warmly recommend any Java developer to download and discover it’s open source glory, especially those who last tried it years ago.
I went from NetBeans 3.1 to JBuilder Enterprise and directly back to NetBeans 3.6 again, and since I haven’t really looked at the commercial IDE’s as an option for my own projects. I have also used Eclipse and IBM’s Websphere Studio Developer (which is based on Eclipse codebase), and although they are fine products, they don’t really do it for me, since I have quite big focus on Java Web Development, and Eclipse needs commercial third party plugins (MyEclipse) to do that well at the moment.

NetBeans IDE 5.0 introduces comprehensive support for developing IDE modules and rich client applications based on the NetBeans platform, the new intuitive GUI builder Matisse, new and redesigned CVS support, Sun Application Server 8.2, Weblogic9 and JBoss 4 support, and a lot of editor enhancements.

Here are some of the cool features in this release:

  • Developing NetBeans Modules
  • Matisse GUI Builder
  • Servers
  • Web Frameworks
  • Web Services
  • Editor Enhancements
  • Code Completion
  • Refactoring
  • Version Control
  • Debugging
  • Other Usability Improvements
  • New NetBeans Add-on Packs

3D Graphics for Java Mobile Devices

Wednesday, October 12th, 2005

Claus Höfele has written a nice introduction to 3D graphics on Mobile Java Devices.

This article, the first in a two-part series, describes the Mobile 3D Graphics API (JSR 184). The author introduces you to 3D programming for Javaâ„¢ mobile devices and shows how you can work with lights, cameras, and materials.

Playing games on mobile devices is a fun pastime. Up until now, hardware performance has favored classic game concepts that use addictive game play, but simple graphics. Today, Tetris and Pac-Man are increasingly complemented by two-dimensional action games with extensive graphics. Consequently, the next step is to move toward 3D graphics. Sony’s PlayStation Portable shows the graphics power you can put into a mobile device. Although the average mobile phone is technologically behind this specialized game machine, you can see where the market is heading. The Mobile 3D Graphics API (M3G for short), defined in Java Specification Request (JSR) 184, is an industry effort to create a standard 3D API for mobile devices that support Java programming.

M3G’s API can be divided roughly into two parts: immediate and retained mode. In immediate mode, you render individual 3D objects. In retained mode, you define and display an entire world of 3D objects, including information on their appearance. You can imagine immediate mode as the low-level access to 3D functions, and retained mode as a more abstract, but also more comfortable, way of displaying 3D graphics. In this article, I’ll explain the immediate mode APIs. The second part of this series shows how to use retained mode.

Article: 3D graphics for Java mobile devices, Part 1: M3G’s immediate mode

CSS3: Multi-column Demo for Firefox

Friday, September 30th, 2005

Since the beginning of web design, there has always been a need to make multi-columned text pages. Sadly HTML and CSS 1+2 has rather weak support for this kind of wrapping techniques. Many workarounds have been created for this using JavaScript and server side pages. But the draft specification of “CSS3 module: Multi-column layout” promises to solve this “column problem” by adding a set of CSS properties.

Mozilla Firefox 1.5 beta adds preliminary support for these properties, so that developer can begin playing with it, not however that the reason the properties begin with “-moz-” is that the CSS3 Multi-column specification is still a draft, so therefore they should not be used for real web design yet, unless it can make a clean fallback when meeting non-mozilla 1.5+ clients.

I have created CSS3: Multi-column module demo for Firefox 1.5 beta – which shows some of the wonders of the new multi-column features, as well a some other CSS properties to create a nice flowing page with highly dynamic columns, and pretty stable compared to many of the older methods, but you need to use Mozilla Firefox 1.5 beta – which I would only recommend to Web Developers.

You can also check some screenshots of the demo, showing it’s ability to create as many columns as it can, while maintaining nice readability thru limited line-width.

CSS3 Multi-column demo 0.2b 001 CSS3 Multi-column demo 0.2b 002
CSS3 Multi-column demo 0.2b 003 CSS3 Multi-column demo 0.2b 004 CSS3 Multi-column demo 0.3b 001

Don’t believe the rumours, check the demo yourself here:

CSS3: Multi-column module demo for Firefox 1.5 beta

See more code samples at Mozilla Developer: CSS3 Columns.

A List Apart: Articles: Introducing the CSS3 Multi-Column Module