Warping it up!

Fini Alring's Glossy Tech Zine

Are we living in a hologram?

Monday, January 26th, 2009

Scary news everybody, our universe might be a 2D hologram.. Twist your minds around that!

… For many months, the GEO600 team-members had been scratching their heads over inexplicable noise that is plaguing their giant detector. Then, out of the blue, a researcher approached them with an explanation. In fact, he had even predicted the noise before he knew they were detecting it. According to Craig Hogan, a physicist at the Fermilab particle physics lab in Batavia, Illinois, GEO600 has stumbled upon the fundamental limit of space-time – the point where space-time stops behaving like the smooth continuum Einstein described and instead dissolves into “grains”, just as a newspaper photograph dissolves into dots as you zoom in. “It looks like GEO600 is being buffeted by the microscopic quantum convulsions of space-time,” says Hogan.

If this doesn’t blow your socks off, then Hogan, who has just been appointed director of Fermilab’s Center for Particle Astrophysics, has an even bigger shock in store: “If the GEO600 result is what I suspect it is, then we are all living in a giant cosmic hologram.” …

LargeHadronCollider.readme

Tuesday, August 26th, 2008

“Want to read every single technical detail of the design and construction of the Large Hadron Collider and its six detectors? The whole shebang — seven reports totaling 1600 pages, 115 MB, with contributions from 8000 scientists and engineers — has been published electronically by the Journal of Instrumentation, free to read without a subscription.”

Paradox no more?: Black hole information loss

Thursday, June 21st, 2007

Physicist may have finally cracked the black hole information loss paradox that has befuddled physicists for the past 40 years, according to an article accepted for publication by Physical Review D, which concludes that that an outside observer can never lose objects down a black hole.Case Western Reserve University physicists Tanmay Vachaspati, Dejan Stojkovic and Lawrence M. Krauss came to this conclusion after spending a year working on complex formulas to calculate the formation of new black holes.

It’s complicated and very complex,” noted the researchers, regarding both the general problem and their particular approach to try to solve it.

The question that the physicists set out to solve is: “what happens once something collapses into a black hole?”

A Detailed Profile of the Hadron Super Collider

Wednesday, May 16th, 2007

“The New York Times has up a lengthy profile of the Large Hadron Collider. The article covers the basics (size = 17 miles, cost = 8 billion, energy consumption = 14 trillon electron volts) and history but also provides interesting interviews of the scientists who work with the facility every day. The piece also goes into some detail on the expected experiments. ‘The physicists, wearing hardhats, kneepads and safety harnesses, are scrambling like Spiderman over this assembly, appropriately named Atlas, ducking under waterfalls of cables and tubes and crawling into hidden room-size cavities stuffed with electronics. They are getting ready to see the universe born again.’ There are photos, video and a nifty interactive graphic.

Mammatus Clouds Rule!!

Thursday, August 11th, 2005

As most of you don’t know, I am a big cloud fan and it never siezes to amaze how infinite chaos can reveal such beauty. I have never seen this type of clouds before – the Mammatus clouds, remind me of melting snow, and have a remarkable dense substance that makes them very special to look at. I will definitely be looking forward to experiencing these wonders in person.

Photos of the Mammatus clouds are (c) copyrighted by Jorn C. Olsen.

See more Spectacular Mammatus Clouds over Hastings, Nebraska.

Be sure to visit Jorn C. Olsen’s Gallery.